Windows Vista activation system explained

Posted on Saturday, Oct 28 2006 @ 08:55 CEST by Thomas De Maesschalck
Microsoft gave some more info about the Windows Vista activation to Bit-Tech:
A Microsoft spokesman from the Licensing Dept told bit-tech that this would not be the case. He told us that Windows Vista will not require a system re-activation unless the hard drive and one other component is changed. This means that enthusiasts will be able to swap CPUs, memory and graphics cards out without any worry about having to re-activate with MS, either on the internet or by phone.

Should you change the hard drive and another piece of hardware - for example for a major upgrade such as a motherboard change that requires a re-installation - Microsoft will allow you to re-activate up to 10 times. You will not, however, be able to have more than one machine activated concurrently..
Read more over here.


About the Author

Thomas De Maesschalck

Thomas has been messing with computer since early childhood and firmly believes the Internet is the best thing since sliced bread. Enjoys playing with new tech, is fascinated by science, and passionate about financial markets. When not behind a computer, he can be found with running shoes on or lifting heavy weights in the weight room.



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Re: Windows Vista activation system explained
by Anonymous on Saturday, Oct 28 2006 @ 18:03 CEST
1 Put it in writing MS. None of this he said she said stuff.

2 We'd be absolute idiots to spend as much as $400 on a license only to find out a year down the road we failed for some reason and have to buy another.

3 "at the discretion of Microsoft" are not exactly reassuring words on whether on a whim, they will force you to buy your license all over again. Hardware dies. And in this case Microsoft wants the user to pay through the nose when it happens.

4 If it was "the same as XP" then why change the EULA? Clearly they have nefarious plans in the works a year down the road when it's far too late to rethink your decision.