Scientists deliver 845GHz transistor

Posted on Saturday, Dec 16 2006 @ 14:31 CET by Thomas De Maesschalck
Scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have again broken their own speed record for the world’s fastest transistor. With a frequency of 845 gigahertz, their latest device is approximately 300 gigahertz faster than transistors built by other research groups, and approaches the goal of a terahertz device.

Made from indium phosphide and indium gallium arsenide, “the new transistor utilizes a pseudomorphic grading of the base and collector regions,” said Milton Feng, the Holonyak Chair Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Illinois. “The compositional grading of these components enhances the electron velocity, hence, reduces both current density and charging time.”

With their latest device, Feng and his research group have taken the transistor to a new range of high-speed operation, bringing the “Holy Grail” of a terahertz transistor finally within reach. Faster transistors translate into faster computers, more flexible and secure wireless communications systems, and more effective combat systems.

More details at the University of Illinois.


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Thomas De Maesschalck

Thomas has been messing with computer since early childhood and firmly believes the Internet is the best thing since sliced bread. Enjoys playing with new tech, is fascinated by science, and passionate about financial markets. When not behind a computer, he can be found with running shoes on or lifting heavy weights in the weight room.



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