Fossil finds challenge human origins theory

Posted on Friday, Aug 10 2007 @ 06:17 CEST by Thomas De Maesschalck
Scientists announced they've found two hominid fossils in Kenya which may rewrite human origins theory. Previously scientists believed the Homo habilis evolved into the Homo erectus which later evolved into us, but these new finds challenge this theory as it appears that both hominids co-existed for a very long time:
The new fossil evidence reveals an overlap of about 500,000 years during which Homo habilis and Homo erectus must have co-existed in the Turkana basin area, the region of East Africa where the fossils were unearthed.

"Their co-existence makes it unlikely that Homo erectus evolved from Homo habilis," said co-author Professor Meave Leakey, palaeontologist and co-director of the Koobi Fora Research Project.

The jaw bone was attributed to Homo habilis because of its distinctive primitive dental characteristics, and was dated to around 1.44 million years ago.

It is the youngest specimen of this species ever found.

The skull was assigned to the species Homo erectus despite being a similar size to that of a habilis skull. Most other erectus skulls found have been considerably larger.

But it displayed typical features of erectus such as a gentle ridge called a "keel" running over the top of the jaw joint. Analysis showed the skull to be about 1.55 million years old.

The new dates indicate that the two species must have lived side by side.
More info at BBC News.


About the Author

Thomas De Maesschalck

Thomas has been messing with computer since early childhood and firmly believes the Internet is the best thing since sliced bread. Enjoys playing with new tech, is fascinated by science, and passionate about financial markets. When not behind a computer, he can be found with running shoes on or lifting heavy weights in the weight room.



Loading Comments