NVIDIA first with OpenGL 3.0 driver support

Posted on Thursday, Aug 14 2008 @ 21:53 CEST by Thomas De Maesschalck
While NVIDIA decided to skip DirectX 10.1 they sure are pretty quick to embrace OpenGL 3.0. This new API was released only two days ago and NVIDIA already released a set of beta drivers with OpenGL 3.0 and GLSL 1.30 support for Windows XP and Windows Vista. You can download the GeForce 177.89 OpenGL 3.0 driver over here.
Yesterday, just two days after the Khronos Group announced the new OpenGL 3.0 standard, NVIDIA Corporation released beta drivers for the cross-platform, 3D graphics standard. The new drivers implement the OpenGL 3.0 API and the GLSL 1.30 shading language for both Windows XP and Windows Vista on selected GeForce and Quadro boards. With these drivers any developer can now explore the capabilities of the new OpenGL 3.0 specification. NVIDIA will be releasing production drivers for OpenGL 3.0 as a part of its regular driver development program.

The OpenGL specification provides software developers a broad set of programmable 3D and 2D graphics rendering, visualization, and hardware acceleration functions, allowing a program to run on a wide variety of hardware platforms. An open, vendor-neutral standard, OpenGL is the industry's most widely used and supported programming interface and is available on major computer platforms, including Windows, Linux, and Mac OS.

"OpenGL 3.0 is a significant advance for graphics standard and we're proud that NVIDIA has played a major role in developing it," said Barthold Lichtenbelt, Manager, Core OpenGL Software at NVIDIA and chair of the OpenGL working group at Khronos. "OpenGL 3.0 will be a first-class API on both GeForce and Quadro boards. Shipping drivers two days after this new specification is released demonstrates our strong commitment to the OpenGL developer community and our partners who rely on the standard."

OpenGL is controlled by the Khronos Group and the new 3.0 version introduces dozens of new features to increase the functionality, flexibility, and performance of the open, cross-platform standard for 3D graphics acceleration. The new functionality includes: vertex array objects, enhanced vertex buffer objects, 32-bit floating-point textures, render and depth buffers, new texture compression schemes, sRGB frame buffers, and an upgraded shading language.


About the Author

Thomas De Maesschalck

Thomas has been messing with computer since early childhood and firmly believes the Internet is the best thing since sliced bread. Enjoys playing with new tech, is fascinated by science, and passionate about financial markets. When not behind a computer, he can be found with running shoes on or lifting heavy weights in the weight room.



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