Astronomers spot 13 billion year old gamma-ray burst

Posted on Thursday, Apr 30 2009 @ 07:27 CEST by Thomas De Maesschalck
NASA's Swift satellite picked up the most remote gamma-ray burst ever detected, the source is estimated to be more than 13 billion light-years away. The blast occurred when the universe was just a couple of hundred million years old.
Other telescopes then followed up the signal, confirming the source to be more than 13 billion light-years away.

Scientists say the star's destruction probably resulted in a black hole.

"This gets us into a realm where we've never been before," said Professor Nial Tanvir, of the University of Leicester, UK.

"This is the most remote gamma-ray burst (GRB) ever detected, and also the most distant object ever discovered."
More info at BBC News.


About the Author

Thomas De Maesschalck

Thomas has been messing with computer since early childhood and firmly believes the Internet is the best thing since sliced bread. Enjoys playing with new tech, is fascinated by science, and passionate about financial markets. When not behind a computer, he can be found with running shoes on or lifting heavy weights in the weight room.



Loading Comments