Sony debuts olivine-type li-ion batteries with 4x more capacity

Posted on Thursday, Aug 13 2009 @ 00:20 CEST by Thomas De Maesschalck
Sony has introduced new li-ion secondary batteries using olivine-type lithium iron phosphate as the cathode material. These new batteries feature over four times the capacity of conventional li-ion batteries and promise a 99 percent recharge in just 30 minutes. The new batteries are also said to be more durable, they promise more than 80 percent capacity retention after 2,000 charge-discharge cycles. Sony says they've started shipping these batteries in June 2009, and that they'll first show up in power tools.
Sony Corporation today announced that it has launched a new type of lithium ion secondary battery that combines high-power and long-life performance, using olivine-type lithium iron phosphate as the cathode material. Shipment commenced in June 2009.

The Olivine-type lithium iron phosphate used in this new battery is extremely suited for use as a cathode material due to its robust crystal structure and stable performance, even at high temperatures. By combining this new cathode material with Sony's proprietary particle design technology that minimizes electrical resistance to deliver high power output, and also leveraging the cell structure design technology Sony accrued developing its current "Fortelion series" lithium ion secondary battery line-up, Sony has realized a high power density of 1800W/kg and extended life span of approximately 2,000 charge-discharge cycles.

Furthermore, with this new battery able to charge rapidly, in addition to providing a stable discharge of voltage, it will first be supplied for use in motor driven devices such as power tools, after which its application will be expanded to a wide range of other mobile electronic devices. With lithium ion secondary batteries able to deliver both compact size and high capacity, their usage continues to diversify and grow. By adding this high-power, long-life lithium ion secondary battery to its lineup, Sony will aim to continue to provide batteries optimized to its customers' requirements, and further strengthen its lithium ion secondary battery business going forward.


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Thomas De Maesschalck

Thomas has been messing with computer since early childhood and firmly believes the Internet is the best thing since sliced bread. Enjoys playing with new tech, is fascinated by science, and passionate about financial markets. When not behind a computer, he can be found with running shoes on or lifting heavy weights in the weight room.



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