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Gmail two hours out due to capacity miscalculation

Posted on Wednesday, September 02 2009 @ 14:28:48 CEST by


Millions of people were unable to check their mail yesterday as Google's Gmail service went offline for nearly two hours. Google offers its apologies and describes what happened in a blog post, apparently they were doing some maintenance on a small fraction of Gmail's server park and underestimated the load that would be placed on the remaining request routers. Some of them overloaded and kicked off a chain-reaction that took out the entire Gmail network within minutes.
Here's what happened: This morning (Pacific Time) we took a small fraction of Gmail's servers offline to perform routine upgrades. This isn't in itself a problem — we do this all the time, and Gmail's web interface runs in many locations and just sends traffic to other locations when one is offline.

However, as we now know, we had slightly underestimated the load which some recent changes (ironically, some designed to improve service availability) placed on the request routers — servers which direct web queries to the appropriate Gmail server for response. At about 12:30 pm Pacific a few of the request routers became overloaded and in effect told the rest of the system "stop sending us traffic, we're too slow!". This transferred the load onto the remaining request routers, causing a few more of them to also become overloaded, and within minutes nearly all of the request routers were overloaded. As a result, people couldn't access Gmail via the web interface because their requests couldn't be routed to a Gmail server. IMAP/POP access and mail processing continued to work normally because these requests don't use the same routers.



 



 

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