Rambus unveils 8GHz XDR2 DRAM memory

Posted on Thursday, Jul 07 2005 @ 19:55 CEST by Thomas De Maesschalck
Rambus today announced the latest version of its high-bandwidth XDR memory interface technology, named XDR2. The XDR2 memory interface uses a micro-threaded DRAM core and circuit enhancements that enable data rates starting at 8GHz, making it five times faster than today's best-in-class GDDR graphics DRAM products.

Building on the high-performance XDR memory interface technology, the XDR2 memory interface is targeting applications that require extreme memory bandwidth, such as 3D graphics, advanced video imaging, and network routing and switching applications. In order to achieve high bandwidth efficiency and data rates of 8GHz and beyond the XDR2 memory interface incorporates:
  • Micro-threading -- a DRAM core innovation developed to increase memory system efficiency to enable DRAMs to provide more usable data bandwidth to requesting memory controllers, while minimizing power consumption;
  • Adaptive Timing -- a speed enhancement to today's XDR FlexPhase timing circuits that compensates for process, voltage and temperature variations during real-time operation;
  • Transmit Equalization -- an output circuit that minimizes the adverse system effects of reflections and attenuation that typically limit the speed of DRAM systems;
  • DRSL Signaling -- a 200mV differential signaling standard that provides superior common mode noise rejection with an on-chip terminated point-to-point topology that minimizes reflections and reduced signal transition times associated with device loading and PCB trace stubs.
  • "We are continually pushing interface technology forward to develop compelling and innovative solutions that meet our customers' needs," said Laura Stark, vice president of the Platform Solutions Group at Rambus. "XDR2 is our latest iteration of the XDR DRAM architecture and will help 3D games and graphics-intensive applications realize the high performance potential that users demand."

    Rambus engineers work closely with chip and system companies to optimize the DRAM controllers to take advantage of the performance benefits that the XDR2 solution provides. The XDR2 memory interface is available for licensing now and could be shipping in products by 2007.


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    Thomas De Maesschalck

    Thomas has been messing with computer since early childhood and firmly believes the Internet is the best thing since sliced bread. Enjoys playing with new tech, is fascinated by science, and passionate about financial markets. When not behind a computer, he can be found with running shoes on or lifting heavy weights in the weight room.



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