Intel Curie module is button-sized chip for wearable electronics

Posted on Wednesday, Jan 07 2015 @ 12:25 CET by Thomas De Maesschalck
Intel logo
Intel revealed its Curie module at CES 2015, a new button-sized hardware product that features Intel's first purpose-built system-on-chip (SoC) for wearable devices.
Intel Corporation today announced a number of technology advancements and initiatives aimed at accelerating computing into the next dimension. The announcements include the Intel® Curie™ module, a button-sized hardware product for wearable solutions; new applications for Intel® RealSense™ cameras spanning robots, flying multi-copter drones and 3-D immersive experiences; and a broad, new Diversity in Technology initiative, which includes a $300 million investment to encourage more diversity at Intel and within the technology industry at large.

"The rise of new personal computing experiences, intelligent and connected devices, and the wearable revolution are redefining the relationship between consumers and technology," said Brian Krzanich, Intel CEO. "Our goal with Intel technology is to help solve real problems and enable experiences that are truly desired by people and businesses. In order to do this, we must also do more to lead the growth of diversity and inclusion within the technology industry. Women and under-represented minorities will continue to play a greater role as consumers, influencers, creators and leaders."

Krzanich made the announcements during a keynote address at the 2015 International Consumer Electronics Show. He also unveiled a wearable device collaboration with Oakley*, a leading product design and sport performance eyewear brand, a 3-D collaboration with HP*, and highlighted True Key™, a new cross-platform application by Intel Security that uses personal factors like the face, device or fingerprint to make logging in easier and safer.

The Wearable Revolution
The growth of wearable technology is creating a new playing field for innovation. Krzanich disclosed plans for the Intel Curie module1, a tiny hardware product based on the company's first purpose-built system-on-chip (SoC) for wearable devices. The module is scheduled to ship in the second half of this year and includes the Intel® Quark™ SE SoC, Bluetooth low-energy radio, sensors and battery charging.

Intel has been actively pursuing the wearable technology segment, and since Krzanich revealed several projects here last year, the company has announced multiple products and initiatives with different fashion, fitness and lifestyle brands. These efforts include Basis Peak*, Fossil Group*, Luxottica Group*, MICA and Opening Ceremony*, SMS Audio*, and the Intel "Make it Wearable" challenge.

Building on this work, Intel and Oakley today announced a strategic wearables collaboration. Oakley is the first Luxottica Group brand that Intel is working with to fuse premium, luxury and sports eyewear with smart technology. Krzanich was joined on stage by Colin Baden, CEO of Oakley, who said the companies are working on an intelligent product, available later this year, designed to enhance athletes' performance.

Krzanich also highlighted Nixie*, the 2014 "Make it Wearable" challenge winner and the first wearable camera that can fly. Nixie rests on your wrist like a bracelet, then unfolds and takes flight on cue to take the perfect shot of you in the moment. Krzanich welcomed Nixie founders Christoph Kohstall and Jelena Jovanovic to the stage to discuss the Intel "Make it Wearable" challenge and highlighted the opportunity it offers to innovators and entrepreneurs. Krzanich and the founders also posed for the first Nixie flying photo. Krzanich went on to say that Intel will sponsor the Intel "Make it Wearable" challenge again later this year.
Intel Curie


About the Author

Thomas De Maesschalck

Thomas has been messing with computer since early childhood and firmly believes the Internet is the best thing since sliced bread. Enjoys playing with new tech, is fascinated by science, and passionate about financial markets. When not behind a computer, he can be found with running shoes on or lifting heavy weights in the weight room.



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