Microsoft to make Windows 10 upgrades less annoying

Posted on Thursday, July 20 2017 @ 13:45 CEST by Thomas De Maesschalck
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Windows as a service with a couple of major upgrades a year sounds good in theory but one of the problems with the current model is that the Windows 10 upgrades basically come down to the installation of a new operating system. Most of your settings are saved but if you've made a lot of customizations to Windows or use third-party tools it can be a nuisance to set everything back the way you want it.

Another issue with the Windows 10 upgrades is that they require quite a bit of time, but fortunately, Microsoft is making some changing to streamline the process. The current Insider Previews for the Fall Creators Update feature some changes that shorten the "offline phase" of the upgrading, which means you'll lose less productive time.
Here is the old way of processing Windows 10 Updates:

Online phase:
  • PC checks for upgrades (manually or automatically)
  • Upgrade payload downloads
  • PC waits for the required reboot to begin install

    Offline phase:
  • PC reboots to begin install process (manually or automatically)
  • User content (apps/settings/configurations) is backed up
  • New OS files are laid down (Windows Image [WIM] process)
  • Drivers and other required OS files are migrated
  • User content is restored
  • PC reboots and the update finalizes

    And here is the new and improved way of doing things according to [Microsoft's Jason] Howard:

    Online phase:
  • PC checks for updates (manually or automatically)
  • Update downloads
  • User content (apps/settings/configurations) is backed up
  • New OS files are laid down (WIM process)
  • PC waits for the required reboot to begin install

    Offline phase:
  • PC reboots to begin install process (manually or automatically)
  • Drivers and other required OS files are migrated
  • User content is restored
  • PC reboots and the update finalizes
  • Via: Hot Hardware




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