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Microsoft gets closer to quantum computing with Majorana fermions

Posted on Monday, April 02 2018 @ 11:49:44 CEST by


MSFT logo
Last week, Microsoft announced a potential breakthrough in quantum computing. Researchers of the software giant managed to capture evidence of Majorana fermions, an element that could be the key to creating a true quantum computer.

Microsoft has devoted significant resources to demonstrate that Majorana fermions can be used to create less error-prone quantum computers, but so far it hasn't been able to create a working qubit yet. The goal is to create a working system by the end of this year. Full details can be read at Bloomberg.
The scientists say they have clear evidence of the creation of Majorana fermions – an elementary particle that its own anti-particle –in a tiny wire that is composed of both semiconducting and superconducting materials, according to research published in the journal Nature Wednesday.

The unique properties of these fermions means that they could be used to create quantum computers with much lower error rates than the designs being trialed by rival companies, such as International Business Machines Corp. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google, that are also racing to bring quantum computers to market. Currently, those other designs produce too many errors in their calculations to be useful for practical applications, such as the ability to create new chemical catalysts or break the most popular forms of encryption.




 



 

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