NVIDIA warns users to upgrade to latest driver to patch security vulnerabilities

Posted on Monday, Aug 05 2019 @ 10:20 CEST by Thomas De Maesschalck
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NVIDIA urges users to upgrade to the latest version of its GPU driver as the company recently fixed a number of potentially dangerous security flaws. The latest version of NVIDIA's GeForce driver fixes five medium and high severity security flaws that may lead to code execution, denial of service, and escalation of privileges.

However, for the average user the risk seems limited as none of these vulnerabilities can be exploited remotely. Exploitation requires local user access so it's not as if these vulnerabilities can be used to gain direct access to your system.
  • CVE?2019?5683 NVIDIA Windows GPU Display Driver contains a vulnerability in the user mode video driver trace logger component. When an attacker has access to the system and creates a hard link, the software does not check for hard link attacks. This behavior may lead to code execution, denial of service, or escalation of privileges.

  • CVE?2019?5684: NVIDIA Windows GPU Display Driver contains a vulnerability in DirectX drivers, in which a specially crafted shader can cause an out of bounds access of an input texture array, which may lead to denial of service or code execution.

  • CVE?2019?5685: NVIDIA Windows GPU Display Driver contains a vulnerability in DirectX drivers, in which a specially crafted shader can cause an out of bounds access to a shader local temporary array, which may lead to denial of service or code execution.

  • CVE?2019?5686: NVIDIA Windows GPU Display Driver contains a vulnerability in the kernel mode layer (nvlddmkm.sys) handler for DxgkDdiEscape in which the software uses an API function or data structure in a way that relies on properties that are not always guaranteed to be valid, which may lead to denial of service.

  • CVE?2019?5687: NVIDIA Windows GPU Display Driver contains a vulnerability in the kernel mode layer (nvlddmkm.sys) handler for DxgkDdiEscape in which an incorrect use of default permissions for an object exposes it to an unintended actor, which may lead to information disclosure or denial of service.


  • About the Author

    Thomas De Maesschalck

    Thomas has been messing with computer since early childhood and firmly believes the Internet is the best thing since sliced bread. Enjoys playing with new tech, is fascinated by science, and passionate about financial markets. When not behind a computer, he can be found with running shoes on or lifting heavy weights in the weight room.



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