Intel's processer numbering scheme decrypted

Posted on Wednesday, Oct 26 2005 @ 00:20 CEST by Thomas De Maesschalck
Tom's Hardware Guide takes a look at the way Intel gives names to its processors.
AMD quit the Gigahertz race in a half-baked manner back in 2001, and Intel more recently decided that processors should no longer be classified by a GHz designation, but also by new features that provide value to the customer. New features such as the execute disable (XD) bit, EM64T extensions or Enhanced SpeedStep were added - the Athlon 64 already had all of them - and a sequence numbering scheme was introduced. This allowed Intel to tack on a premium price tag to same-clock-speed chips, while tripling the size of its processor portfolio (counting both the older products and the newer model-numbered ones.)
Read on over here to find out more.


About the Author

Thomas De Maesschalck

Thomas has been messing with computer since early childhood and firmly believes the Internet is the best thing since sliced bread. Enjoys playing with new tech, is fascinated by science, and passionate about financial markets. When not behind a computer, he can be found with running shoes on or lifting heavy weights in the weight room.



Loading Comments