1024-bit RSA not safe enough anymore?

Posted on Tuesday, May 29 2007 @ 06:15 CEST by Thomas De Maesschalck
ARS Technica reports that 1024-bit RSA encryption may soon not be safe enough anymore. Encryption researchers recently managed to break down a 307-digit composite Mersenne number into primes, and RSA keys are the next target.
"Last time, it took nine years for us to generalize from a special to a nonspecial, hard-to-factor number," Lenstra said in a statement, referring to a 155-digit number that his team had broken previously. More recently, a 200-digit non-special number was factored in 18 months and roughly 50 years of computer time. This 307-digit crack took even less (human) time, which Lenstra credits to more powerful computers and improved code. "I will not make predictions [about the future of 1024-bit encryption], but let us just say that it might be a good idea to stay tuned."

Why does anyone care? While your average Joe or Jane on the street will not be able to crack a 1024-bit RSA key anytime soon, experienced attackers might not have such a hard time. Getting the computing power to crack a 1024-bit key could be as easy as employing a decent-sized botnet or two.


About the Author

Thomas De Maesschalck

Thomas has been messing with computer since early childhood and firmly believes the Internet is the best thing since sliced bread. Enjoys playing with new tech, is fascinated by science, and passionate about financial markets. When not behind a computer, he can be found with running shoes on or lifting heavy weights in the weight room.



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