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Transmeta to show off 90nm Efficeon processors this week

Posted on Monday, May 31 2004 @ 22:05:35 CEST by

During this weeks Computex in Taipei Transmeta is going to show off its new Efficeon CPUs made on the 90nm procedure.
The 90nm Efficeon microprocessors will sport LongRun2 technology for optimized power consumption and will also increase performance over 130nm predecessor. The first 90nm chip to be demonstrated at Computex Taipei 2004 later this week will function at 1.60GHz, about 300MHz higher compared to today’s flagship Efficeon chip. Transmeta’s processors that will debut in products later this year will also sport NX bit, a security feature supported by AMD64 and future Intel’s Pentium 4 central processing units.

Transmeta’s new LongRun2 technology is able to control transistor leakage through software while a chip is running. Transmeta’s LongRun2 software works to control leakage as an interdisciplinary solution in combination with special circuits in the Efficeon processor, and with a standard CMOS process. During the demonstration at the Microprocessor Forum conference, Transmeta showed the Efficeon processor adjusting leakage up to hundreds of times per second while playing a video game, playing a DVD movie and going into standby. In standby mode, Efficeon core leakage power was reduced by approximately 70 times by using LongRun2 technology, according to Transmeta.
Transmeta's 90nm chips are made at Fujitsu's Microelectronics facility in Japan. The first chips for Transmeta were produced in January 2004.

Source: X-bit Labs



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