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Lithium breakthrough may lead to batteries that charge in seconds

Posted on Thursday, March 12 2009 @ 21:23:01 CET by

MIT researchers have developed a new lithium-ion battery electrode that can deliver electricity much faster than current batteries. The new battery technology may lead to batteries that charge in seconds, and it's also useful for applications that require a rapid discharge like electric cars or laser weapons.
Test batteries based on the new electrode--developed by Gerbrand Ceder, a professor of materials science at MIT--can be discharged in 10 seconds. In comparison, the best high-power lithium-ion batteries today discharge in a minute and a half, and conventional lithium-ion batteries, such as those in laptops, can take hours to discharge. The new high rate, the researchers calculate, would allow a one-liter battery based on the material to deliver 25,000 watts, or enough power for about 20 vacuum cleaners.

This level of power output would put these batteries on par with ultracapacitors, gadgets that can rapidly discharge power but can't carry much energy for their size, says John Miller, a vice president for systems and applications at Maxwell Technologies, a manufacturer of ultracapacitors, who wasn't involved in the research. The new batteries would store nearly 10 times as much energy as an ultracapacitor of the same size. The combination of small size and extreme power could make the batteries particularly useful for race cars, he says. (Starting this year, new Formula One racing rules will allow race cars to store energy from braking to deliver very brief jolts of acceleration.)
More info at Technology Review and ARS Technica.



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