Optimizing Windows Vista

Posted on Sunday, Jul 15 2007 @ 16:36 CEST by Thomas De Maesschalck
ExtremeTech published some more tips to improve the performance of your Windows Vista system:
The core Windows components can be thought of as the steel beam structure of a skyscraper. This basic structure of the building provides support for all the other components. Windows Vista is a massive program that has various layers of components that support each other. This chapter is going to help you tweak the core components of Windows to increase the overall performance of your computer. Instead of a steel beam structure,Windows Vista's core components are short-term memory (RAM, a.k.a. volatile memory), long-term storage (your hard drive, a.k.a. non-volatile memory), and the CPU. All the programs that run on Windows, including Windows itself, eventually break down to these three core components.

To get started, you are going to tweak your system's short-term memory using some techniques and features of Windows Vista to increase the speed of memory operations. Then, you are going to hack another critical component, the paging system, and then speed up your hard drive and adjust how your CPU does work. These tweaks and hacks will help you speed up the overall performance of your computer..
Check it out over here.


About the Author

Thomas De Maesschalck

Thomas has been messing with computer since early childhood and firmly believes the Internet is the best thing since sliced bread. Enjoys playing with new tech, is fascinated by science, and passionate about financial markets. When not behind a computer, he can be found with running shoes on or lifting heavy weights in the weight room.



Loading Comments