Intel to bring 64-bit extensions to notebooks, but not in short term

Posted on Thursday, Feb 19 2004 @ 21:06 CET by Thomas De Maesschalck
Intel said at the IDF that it is preparing mobile processors with 64-bit extensions. But these will not be available in the short term they said.
Intel confirmed today that its Pentium 4 E (Prescott) processors will get 64-bit extension technology enabled in mid-year for 1P workstations, but remained tight-lipped on its mobile 64-bit CPUs.

“We have not gotten to that level of detail on PC clients so far,” an Intel’s spokesperson said.

In addition to actual 64-bit processors Intel will need to build supporting infrastructure for such chips, e.g., chipsets.

As reported earlier, the company’s Prescott micro-architecture already sports 64-bit capabilities. Remembering that there are Intel Pentium 4 E processors slated for launch later this year, we may anticipate that Intel will eventually enable the 64-bit support by the core as well as by the infrastructure. This would be the most cost-effective choice of adding 64-bit functionality to portable, but not really mobile computers.

Another processor lineup Intel has in its roadmap is Pentium M products tailored specifically for mobile needs and that does not have much in common with NetBurst architecture – the base for the Pentium 4 central processing units. Theoretically, Intel may incorporate its 64-bit enhancements into “non-NetBurst” processors too, but the question is whether there is any real need for 64-bits in thin and light notebooks.

Since high performance and additional computing functionality is generally expected from desktop replacement laptops, it is more logical to wait for Intel to announce a flavour of Mobile Pentium 4 E processor with 64-bit extension technology enabled.

AMD targets its Mobile Athlon 64 processors as well as DTR Athlon 64 processors for powerful notebook computers. For thin-and-light laptops it offers special versions of its 32-bit Athlon XP CPUs.
Source: X-bit Labs


About the Author

Thomas De Maesschalck

Thomas has been messing with computer since early childhood and firmly believes the Internet is the best thing since sliced bread. Enjoys playing with new tech, is fascinated by science, and passionate about financial markets. When not behind a computer, he can be found with running shoes on or lifting heavy weights in the weight room.



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