HLNAND SSD delivers fastest per-channel Flash performance

Posted on Monday, Aug 02 2010 @ 21:27 CEST by Thomas De Maesschalck
MOSAID Technologies presented a prototype of the HyperLink NAND (HLNAND) architecture and interface, which promises to deliver the highest performance available on a single channel of HLNAND Flash memory. The company says its solution can deliver 213MB/s read performance and 130MB/s write performance on a single channel, while current second-generation SSDs typically require eight or mroe channels to achieve similar performance.
MOSAID Technologies Inc. (TSX:MSD) today introduced a Solid State Drive (SSD) prototype utilizing MOSAID's innovative HyperLink NAND (HLNAND™) architecture and interface. Designed by MOSAID and its development partner INDILINX, the HLNAND SSD prototype is optimized for mass storage applications, including enterprise data centers and high-performance computing environments.

MOSAID's HLNAND SSD prototype proves that 213MBps read performance and 130MBps write performance is achievable on a single channel of HLNAND Flash memory. In contrast, current second-generation SSDs require eight or more channels for the same level of performance.

"The goal of the HLNAND program is to develop advanced solutions that will significantly enhance the performance of Flash technology in commercial products," said Jin-Ki Kim, Vice President R&D, MOSAID. "Our prototype demonstrates the unprecedented level of Flash performance and flexibility that can be delivered in an SSD when implementing HLNAND technology. With our solution, SSD designers can achieve an industry leading concentration of throughput on each channel, without experiencing roll-off with heavily populated rings."

As the first major new Flash memory architecture and device interface development in 20 years, HLNAND Flash combines MOSAID's HyperLink memory technology with industry standard NAND Flash cell technology. HLNAND delivers sustained input/output (I/O) bandwidths an order of magnitude higher than conventional Flash by utilizing a point-to-point ring topology that achieves an extremely high level of signal integrity and significantly reduced loading. For more information, visit www.hlnand.com.

MOSAID is showcasing its HLNAND SSD prototype at the 2010 Flash Memory Summit, August 17-19 in Santa Clara California. A paper on the next phase of HLNAND technology development will also be presented.

HLNAND SSD Prototype - Design Details
The HLNAND SSD is a fully functional, Serial ATA2 (SATA2) compatible prototype incorporating a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA)-based controller and MOSAID's HLNAND modules, built in the 3.5 inch form factor. The HLNAND SSD prototype uses two 64GB HLDIMM modules (eight multi-chip packages (MCPs) per module, 16 MCPs in total) arranged on a single channel. MOSAID provided the HLDIMM modules, and INDILINX built the controller and system board.

Prototype design limitations required reducing the HyperLink channel clock from 133MHz to 75MHz. A production version of the HLNAND SSD utilizing an FPGA-based or ASIC-based controller with eight channels would operate at the full 133MHz clock to achieve read and write throughput each exceeding 1TB/s.

The HLNAND SSD is intended for use in high-speed, mass storage applications, including desktop workstations, computing and enterprise equipment, light-weight mobile devices and gaming equipment, or as external drive.

Availability
Licenses for manufacturing MOSAID's HLNAND 64Gb NAND Flash memory device and 64GB HLDIMM module in production quantities are available to semiconductor suppliers, packaging and module suppliers, product manufacturers and system integrators. MOSAID's engineering team is ready to support licensees for rapid product introduction.


About the Author

Thomas De Maesschalck

Thomas has been messing with computer since early childhood and firmly believes the Internet is the best thing since sliced bread. Enjoys playing with new tech, is fascinated by science, and passionate about financial markets. When not behind a computer, he can be found with running shoes on or lifting heavy weights in the weight room.



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