HP to offer 11.8-teraflop supercomputer

Posted on Wednesday, Apr 06 2005 @ 15:00 CEST by Thomas De Maesschalck
HP today announced that the U.S. Department of Energy's new state-of-the art research supercomputer has completed a two-year acceptance process by the agency's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL).

The product of an intensive collaboration between HP and PNNL, the 11.8-teraflop, Linux-based supercomputer was designed specifically for computational biology and chemistry research, and is one of the fastest in the world for those applications.

It boasts power of nearly 2,000 1.5-gigahertz IntelĀ® ItaniumĀ® 2 processors that have the ability to communicate with each other in less than three micro-seconds. It also has 6.8 terabytes of local memory.

Scientists already are using a variety of applications on the supercomputer to analyze and compile data regarding geochemical modeling, heavy element chemistry, modeling of chemistry on porous sites, groundwater flow simulations, nanosize particle modeling, and evaluation of molecular thermodynamics, kinetics and prediction of excited states.

"The HP and PNNL collaboration is a good example of how industry and research laboratories can partner to create unique solutions to national problems," said Dr. George Michaels, director of the Computational and Information Sciences Directorate at PNNL. "Our collaboration has resulted in building a supercomputer that will enable scientists to integrate and access data at an unprecedented rate, transforming their ability to do detailed computer modeling on a whole host of subjects. Research scientists from around the world will be able to make use of its power."

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Wash., is one of nine U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) multi-program national laboratories. PNNL is operated by Battelle on behalf of DOE's Office of Science. In addition to supporting the research and education of future scientists and engineers, PNNL focuses on delivering breakthrough science and technology to meet key national environmental, energy, health and national security objectives. The DOE's William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, located on the campus of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, is widely regarded as the premier laboratory for computational biology and chemistry.


About the Author

Thomas De Maesschalck

Thomas has been messing with computer since early childhood and firmly believes the Internet is the best thing since sliced bread. Enjoys playing with new tech, is fascinated by science, and passionate about financial markets. When not behind a computer, he can be found with running shoes on or lifting heavy weights in the weight room.



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