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Big ISPs deliberately ruining video streaming

Posted on Thursday, August 01 2013 @ 12:02:50 CEST by


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A new report by ARS Technica claims major ISPs intentionally degrade streaming video, including that of YouTube and Netflix, as part of dirty negotiation tactics with the content providers. The article highlights that most large ISPs demand money from content providers who send data their way, they basically want to get paid on both ends; by the customer who requests the data and also by the content provider who provides the video service.
"Typically what happened is when the connections reached about 50 percent utilization, the two parties agreed to upgrade them and they would be upgraded in a timely manner," Cogent CEO Dave Schaeffer told Ars. "Over the past year or so, as we have continued to pick up Netflix traffic, Verizon has continuously slowed down the rate of upgrading those connections, allowing the interconnections to become totally saturated and therefore degrading the quality of throughput."

Schaeffer said this is true of all the big players to varying degrees, naming Comcast, Time Warner, CenturyLink, and AT&T. Out of those, he said that "AT&T is the best behaved of the bunch."

Letting ports fill up can be a negotiating tactic. Verizon and Cogent each have to spend about $10,000 for equipment when a port is added, Schaeffer said—pocket change for companies of this size. But instead of the companies sharing equal costs, Verizon wants Cogent to pay because more traffic is flowing from Cogent to Verizon than vice versa.




 



 

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