Applied Nanotech demonstrates 25-inch carbon nanotube TV

Posted on Friday, Sep 09 2005 @ 10:22 CEST by Thomas De Maesschalck
Applied Nanotech, a subsidiary of Nano-Proprietary, recently showed off a proof of concept of a high resolution, full color, 25-inch diagonal carbon nanotube (CNT) TV.

A demonstration video of the proof of concept in operation is available here. The video clip clearly shows that, as with the 14-inch, the video image does not suffer from the "ghost images" that can be observed in large LCD and plasma TVs as a tail of the image moving across the screen. As expected, the image and its characteristics are similar to the cathode ray tube, since CNT TVs are a flat and thin extension of the CRT technology.

The proof of concept has a 25-inch diagonal glass substrate with a 22-inch diagonal viewing area and operates at a voltage that is fully compatible with low cost CMOS drivers. The distance between subpixels, which is a little larger than .5mm, was selected so that the printing techniques utilized are compatible with 60-inch diagonal Advanced TV format and 80-inch diagonal High Definition TV.

"This proof of concept is a critical achievement in that the processes, including printing-like processes, used in creating the display will allow manufacturers to dramatically reduce the capital investment needed to produce CNT TVs," said Dr. Zvi Yaniv, Chief Executive Officer of Applied Nanotech.

As the industry moves from ATV format to HDTV format (720 x 1280 lines), the 25-inch diagonal concept proves that ANI CNT technology is fully capable of HDTV format on 80-inch diagonal TVs (defined by the Japanese National Broadcasting Corporation NHK as the main target for consumer TVs).

"Although we are obviously not television manufacturers, I am extremely proud of our team's accomplishment of perfecting the processes necessary for the production of CNT TVs," said Marc Eller, Chief Executive Officer of Nano-Proprietary, Inc. "This greatly improves the chances of getting a partner to initiate pilot production."


About the Author

Thomas De Maesschalck

Thomas has been messing with computer since early childhood and firmly believes the Internet is the best thing since sliced bread. Enjoys playing with new tech, is fascinated by science, and passionate about financial markets. When not behind a computer, he can be found with running shoes on or lifting heavy weights in the weight room.



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